B1 · B2 · Vocabulary

Confusing words: advise – advice

advise/advice

Advise /əd’vaɪz /  (verb) Notice that these two words have a different pronunciation

Meaning to tell somebody what you think they should or shouldn’t do in a particular situation. Here are some patterns for this verb.

  • Advise somebody: His brother couldn’t advise him because he was far too busy.
  • Advise something: The government has advised extreme caution.
  • Advise somebody to do something: I would advise you to check this essay before handing it in.
  • advise that: They advised that a bottle of water should always be carried with visitors.
  • advise doing something: I’d advise booking your table in advance.

Advice / əd’vais / (uncountable noun)

Meaning  the  information  that is given on a particular issue.

  • Advice on health care.
  • Ask your teacher for advice/ask your teacher’s advice.
  • Take my advice. Let me give you a piece of advice/some advice.

Activity

B1 · B2 · Vocabulary

Confusing words: after- later- afterwards

after/later/afterwards

After (Prep) meaning later than something, or following another event in time. This form is used in front of a noun phrase.

  • We’ll leave after they call.
  • They lost contact after their grandmother’s death.

Later (Adv) Meaning after the time of speaking

  • See you later!

Later (Adj) Meaning after something else or in the future or an advance period of something.

  • The taxi arrived an hour later than expected.
  • The concert has been postponed to a later date.
  • She wrote her most interesting poems in her later life.

Afterwards ( is used when referring to an action followed by another one.

  • We went out to dinner and afterwards we went to the theatre.

Activity

B1 · B2 · Vocabulary

Confusing words: ache-hurt-pain

Ache/hurt/pain

Ache (verb) meaning that a part of your body hurts in a continuous and dull way. Ache (noun) referring to a continuous dull pain. This word is usually used in combination with the part of body that is in pain.

  • Stomach ache, toothache, headache, or my stomach aches.

Hurt (verb transitive and intransitive) to cause physical pain to yourself/somebody. This verb doesn’t give information on the type of pain/ache it only explains that somebody is in a certain degree of pain or that somebody/something is causing it.

  • Stop! You’re hurting me!
  • Yesterday I fell over. Now my leg hurts/I hurt my leg.

Pain (noun) Not usually used as a verb. Meaning referring to physical suffering in general, often more severe than ‘ache’, used with parts of the body. e.g. pain in my leg, arm, shoulder etc.

  • He was clearly in pain.
  • This should help relieve the pain.

Activity

Idioms

Idiom (or saying): Birds of a feather flock together

In Spain we would say something like ‘Dios los crea y ellos se juntan’ for this saying or idiom, but in English, heavenly spirits have nothing to do with how humans interact with each other. Rather than this, typical behaviour is associated to animals (in this case to birds).

Try to quess which meaning is associated to the idiom on the button below.