A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A1/A2 Countable and uncountable nouns

Countable and uncountable nouns in English are on many occasions sort of confusing and sometimes beginners need some picture activities to help them memorize some of the words in English that are uncountable. It may be a bit of a drag, but as a matter of fact, if you don´t know them you will have some problems when you have to use determiners like `much and many`.  Here´s a quick drag-and-drop quiz to help remember some of the rules.

Click for quiz

B2 · B2 Grammar · C1 · Grammar activity · vocabulary activity

The Computer says no

Carol Beer.gif
gif from Gfycat.com

Have you ever been to a hospital reception, a bank or any public place where you were treated rudely or even roughly? What did you feel like?

In the last book I read – by the way it was Andrea Levy’s ‘Every Light in the House Burnin’- the narrator fantasizes on picking up a doctor by the throat because she had referred to her dying father as ‘Old man Jacobs’ and shown a great deal of aloofness. The novel, in fact, devotes some chapters to humorously criticizing the English healthcare system. Fortunately, the novel is set in London during the 60s and many things have improved since then.

As an activity that can raise some subject of debate in an English class or serve as a warm-up activity as well as serving the purpose for practising Your listening skills you can click on the video.

After you can also do some use of English practice with a text from Wikipedia on the same subject which has been adapted as an open cloze for missing prepositions, adverbs, relative pronouns/adverbs or articles.

Click here for open cloze

Disclaimers

  • Video from Youtube channel Beferninand
  • Text for Open Cloze from Wikipedia

A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Object pronouns

There always seems to be a little confusion with subject and object pronouns so here’s a short explainer video, made with bitable (which I really love), to give some help along with an activity you can do after.

Click for bitable video

B1 · B2 · culture · Grammar activity

Where did Christmas crackers come from?

crackers
Photo from Getty

In Britain not pulling a cracker means that something is missing! Both children and adults love them and they add more fun and laughter to Christmas dinner and parties. But where did this tradition come from? I came across this article and found it such a sweet story that I just couldn’t help not using it, so this one is to help you go over past tenses (active and passive ) and some  present tenses too.

The source is Metro.co.uk

Click for activity

A1 · A2 · B1 · Grammar activity · Vocabulary

Do, go, play or nothing?

Which option should we use? Here are a couple of tips. After, click on the activity button for some practice.

Go + place

  • for when we go to a specific place to do it. For example: We go to the gym.

Go + -ing (activity noun)

  • Go + activity usually before words that end in -ing and especially if we have to go somewhere to do this activity. Here’s an example:

‘Where do you usually go on Saturdays?’  On Saturdays I go dancing (here the person goes somewhere to do this).

Do + noun 

  • Recreational activities that are not in teams and not played on a board. For example: Do aerobics or or do sport (we can also say play sport).

Play + noun

  • Play + noun not ending in -ing. When it refers to a team game (football, basketball, etc),  or a board game (chess, ludo, etc).

Play + the name of instrument

  • Play + the+ name of an instrument.

I play the piano. What instrument do you play?

Click for activity

 

A2 · B1 · B2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Another way to learn irregular verbs

errorman

One way to learn irregular verbs is to divide them into groups.

According to some grammar books, irrregular English verbs DO seem to have some type of regularity.  Here are some tips along with a couple of activities.

 

 

CLASS 1

In this group, verbs remain nearly the same and change final -d for -t.

For example: build> built > built.

CLASS 1 ACTIVITY

CLASS 2

Verbs are the same in Past Simple and Past Participle, receive an -d/-ed/t suffix but change one or more vowels.

For example: leave > left> left

CLASS 2 ACTIVITY

CLASS 3

In this group the Past Simple usually has -ed but the Past Participle had -(e)n.

This is a small group and I suppose I’ll be adding some more if I can remember any.

For example: show > showed > shown

CLASS 3 ACTIVITY

CLASS 4

The past tense doesn’t have a suffix although it may change a vowel, but the Past Participle has an -(e)n suffix and the base vowel changes or both changes may happen.

For example: give > gave > given

CLASS 4 ACTIVITY

CLASS 5

In this group the vowel changes in one or both. There are no other changes.

For example: begin > began > begun

CLASS 5 ACTIVITY

CLASS 6

All the verbs are the same!

For example: put > put > put

CLASS 6 ACTIVITY

CLASS 7

One or both of the forms is/are completely different.

For example: go > went > gone – Be > was/were > been