B1 · B2 · Grammar activity

Art or reality?

Migul Riopa via Getty images
British contemporary artist Anish Kapoor stands next his artwork “Descent into limbo” during the opening of his exhibition entitled “Works, thoughts, experiments” at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, on July 6, 2018.  Photo by Miguel Riopa Getty Images.

Can you imagine visiting an art gallery or a museum, seeing something very interesting and then, surprise! What you took for one thing was something quiet unexpected.

Let’s say for example that you visit the Natural History Museum in London. You’re in the creepy-crawly section taking selfies of yourself in front of what you believe is a huge, gigantic, enormous fibreglass model of a scorpion and suddenly it starts to move its pincers and tail. Eeeeks! It’s alive!!!! What a fright that would be wouldn’t it?

Anyway, don’t fret because this post isn’t about gigantic creatures coming to life, but another bit of news  about a man who fell into a hole at a Portuguese museum because he ‘d walked over it thinking it was a dot.
The news is from Huffpost and you will have to fill in the gaps with one of the words on the left-hand side of the activity. I made the activity with a free online application from the website ‘clickschool ‘ just to see how it goes and try out some new learning tools.

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A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A2 Comparative structures ‘adjective + er/more + than’

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Here’s a grammar bite on comparative structures using ‘adjective+ er/more/less + than’  that we can use when we want to say that two items are different in a quality.

Remember that the general rule for one-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives,  (small, clever, happy, etc.) is the affix -er, while other adjectives  (honest, beautiful, interesting, etc.) have the word ‘more’ in front of them.

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A2 · B1 · B2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Confusing words ‘another/other’

Hello, here we have another two confusing words for you to have a look at. You can check a few grammar rules and do the activity with a simple click on the buttons below. Hope it helps!

B1 · B2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

‘Although, though, even though’, ‘despite’ or ‘in spite of’ ?

Hello! Here’s a video from bitable that explains how to use these linking devices.

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A2 · B1 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Stative verbs

Think or thinking ? Have or having? When dealing with stative verbs, we basically mean those verbs that describe a state instead of an action, but this can be a tricky thing  and sometimes a verb belongs to both categories depending on context. When can we use these  verbs in the progressive form? Here are a few tips along with a quiz.

A2 · B1 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Word order for adjectives

ADJECTIVES THAT GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT A NOUN (NOUN MODIFIERS)

We can give information about something by using adjectives.

  • An Italian car.
  • Dark hair.

 These adjectives can  come before a noun although they can also come after a verb. Here we are going to see them in front of a noun. (predicative position). Look at the boxes and after do the grammar activity.

We can use a lot of adjectives but in the English language we usually have a pattern of preference for which adjectives come first.

  • A beautiful, red Italian car.
  • Long curly dark hair.

 … But which one comes first? There is a general rule according to the type of information the adjective is giving.

ARTICLE/QUANTIFIER/NUMBER SIZE SHAPE COLOUR NOUN
 – long curly dark hair
Two big yellow scarves

Or…

 

A/Q/N OPINION AGE SIZE SHAPE COLOUR ORIGIN MATERIAL NOUN
 – long curly dark hair
Two big yellow scarves
An ugly old square grey British concrete block of flats
A lovely new big round white Spanish wooden table

the more adjectives we add, the more complicated the things gets. We might have to give very long descriptions which would look something like the box above. Luckily, we don’t usually use this in speech because our interlocutor might start yawning.