Advanced C1 word formation activity · C1 · Word formation

Word formation, Advanced C1:Ten Things Tourist Should’t do When Visiting London

Have you ever visited London? Many of my students haven’t which is a real pity because this city is an incredible place bustling with life and exciting things to do. It’s also a cultural melting pot where you would hardly go out without meeting people from all walks of life.

What’s it like?

If you walk around London, you’ll see that it is an astonishing blend of tradition and innovation. You’ll see typical London pubs with all their flowers hanging out and the menus chalked in Times Roman out on the street claiming both, locals and tourists’ attention to stop and savour a lager or some fish and chips and just a few metres ahead, there’ll be a design museum or a second-hand store or whatever.

Are visitors welcome?

Concerning hospitality, the British tend to mind their own business, but if they sense that you may be lost or confused, somebody will very probably politely ask you if you need any help. However, don’t take this for granted, helpful doesn’t mean that they easily tolerate queue-jumping, or pedestrians getting in their way during the rush hour. Here you would most probably get an intimidating ‘Oi, you!’

Is London expensive?

Well as all cities, it depends on what you intend to do but it isn’t half as expensive as other European ones, like Paris or Rome and even if you could feel a bit upset for having to pay a few bob for a pint of beer, there are hundreds of other things you can do for pennies or for free, like visiting the wonderful museums, or having a picnic in one of London’s beautiful parks, just to mention a couple.

Will London hurt? And… will it go away?

Well, I’m not going to go on bragging about London because I’d end up writing a really long article, but I can assure you that, not only it doesn’t hurt, but it’s really worth a visit and NO, once you’ve been there, it will never, ever go away! (You’ve had it mate!)

So what are you waiting for? Here’s a word formation activity I’ve adapted from an article with some tips for visiting London (without putting your foot in it), for those brave souls that want to be on the safe side before setting off on their trip.

The article is from The Culturetrip.com and images from Unsplashed.

Click for word formation activity

B2 · B2 word formation · Upper intermediate B2 word formation · Word formation

Word formation activity: Personality and behaviour vocabulary

How would you describe your best friend? Would you say he or she is kind? Does this person always treat people with great kindness? Does your friend always behave kindly in all the majority of situations? And have you ever seen this person be unkind? Here we’ve used the word kind, which is an adjective in different ways, as a noun, as an adverb and even with a negative prefix. To achieve a good level of English, you’ll have to be pretty good at noticing how a word is used or the type of word you will need to complete a sentence. You’ll also need to have a good knowledge on the use of prefixes and suffixes in order to change words from one class to another or even give them a negative meaning. The bad news is that there are quite a few rules and also quite a few exceptions to these rules, but the good news is that through practice, you’ll eventually achieve a reasonable degree of skill for this type of activity.

Every now and then, I’ll try to place some activities on the blog to cover this part of learning English. Please don’t leave this type of content until the day before your exams, as it is only through practice that word formation samples ‘will stick’.

Here’s an activity related to words that we could use to describe people’s characters and they way in which they behave.

Click here for grammar slide

Click here for word formation activity

Advanced C1 word formation activity · C1 · Word formation

Word formation activity Advanced level C1: Why do Brits Talk About the Weather so Much?

People walikng in the rain with umbrellas, UK: Wet and windy weekend for Britain
Photo from The Telegraph

Is it actually true that the British spend a lot of their time talking about the weather, or this just another one of those beliefs like ‘we have to have tea at five on the dot or we’ll go bananas ’,  sort of stuff ?  And, if it is true, is this feature shared by other cultures?

Well, I must say that we are particularly fond of talking about the weather, although I would also say that  it’s  a common topic of conversation in Spain too. However, what I do seem to notice is that people from these countries have a different way to approach this subject even when both typically use it as an icebreaker.

Where I live, people usually make exclamations about it. Sort of like ‘Vaya frio! Where a Brit would most probably make a tactfully brief statement of one or two words and polish it off with a question tag, ‘Cold, isn’t it?

Looking into this aspect of British culture, I found this really interesting article  that I’ve used to create a word formation activity for higher levels of English (C1 more or less).

The  article is from the BBC by Linda Geddes

Read the text and focus on each blank  using the words in brackets. The missing words are either adjectives or adverbs as the focus here is to practise with the different types of prefixes (yes, there are a couple of negative ones), and suffixes used to form these words.

Click for word formation activity

B2 · Upper intermediate B2 word formation · Word formation

Word formation activity: Balconing

I wish I hadn’t got a hateful tendency to pick out horrible scraps of news for some of our activities. What I would really like is to always be in a very positive mood and only mention the very beautiful things related to my home island. But I just guess that part of my blog will be devoted to some of the things that would welcome a change such as the extremely dangerous practice (not to mention suicidal and stupid) of Balconing,  that is becoming more and more popular among some young tourists that visit the island of Majorca.  This is a word formation activity adapted from Euroweekly.

Click to activity