B1 · B2 · Sin categoría

Modal verbs: Making a guess in the present

Have you ever witnessed a crime? What happened? For this activity, I’ve used a picture captured by a surveillance camera and I wrote a short description of what I thought was happening. Of course, I could not be sure, so that was why I was making guesses. In the example, you’ll see that I used modal verbs and perception verbs like ‘seem’ and ‘look like’.

C1 · C2 · Idioms

12 Idioms related to books or pages

If you find yourself in somebody’s good books, you’re lucky and thankfully, they won’t throw the books at you. But maybe it’s just because you always go by the book or even took a leaf out of somebody else’s book at work. Before you get all bookish trying to figure out what I’m on about, why don’t you try doing this fun quiz with 12 idiomatic expressions related to books or pages? I’m sure you’ll enjoy it.

B1 · B2

Styles of music quiz

Image by Rajesh Kavasseri on Unsplash

What’s your favourite style of music? Do you listen to different styles according to your mood? Do you find any particular music uplifting or disturbing? Can you play an instrument? What’s your favourite group or who’s your favourite musician? Have you heard anything good recently? Do you spend a lot of time listening to music? And if you do, where do you get this music from? In this quiz, you’ll find vocabulary for styles of music for intermediate levels (B1 and B2). Just look at the card and drag and drop the right word into the box.

A2 · B1 · Learning English with songs · Listening

David Bowie – The Man Who Sold the World

Here’s a song written by David Bowie back in the 70s that became very famous again when Nirvana performed their fantastic cover. It wasn’t an easy task for me to decide which version to use; because I love both of them, but since very few people know that Bowie wrote it, I eventually decided to use this one. The aim of this activity is to become familiar with the relative pronoun ‘who’ and to practise simple past verbs. There are two versions, one with the verbs in brackets and the second one without the verbs.

B1 · B2 · phrasal verbs

Phrasal verbs for work

As a teacher, I know very well how students feel about phrasal verbs as there are so many. But although phrasal verbs are very commonly used in English, I don’t recommend learning them by heart – I mean sitting for ages in front of a paper with lists and lists of them. Rather than this, I’d try to use two new ones in each class and bit by bit, students would get familiar with them, as well as knowing how to use them. Another additional difficulty about learning phrasal verbs, is that the meaning of these chunks of words, rely very heavily on the sentence in which they appear. An example of this is ‘lock up’. If this appears in in a sentence related to a place, it means to close a business for the day, but if it appears in a sentence related to a person, it could mean to hold a person captive.

In this blog post I want to try out a new tool with my students in order to foster self-study. I’ve used GoConq to create a mind map with common phrasal verbs that belong to the topic of work within intermediate levels (B1 and B2). In each section of the mind map, you’ll find a quiz related to the phrasal verbs that have been included and in the first part of the diagram, a short note on the meaning of each one.

B1 · B2 · Vocabulary

Vocabulary for speaking about work

Image by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

What do you do for a living? What’s your work like? Is it challenging or tedious? Do you consider that your job is well paid or is it badly paid? What’s important for you at work, wages, the working environment or the promotion prospects? Would you like to set up your own business? In this vocabulary activity, you ‘re going to see words that are commonly used to describe different aspects of this topic such as: payment, time and describing the job you do. Don’t forget to subscribe and/ or leave a like if you found the activity useful.

A2 · B1 · B2 · Learning English with songs

Don’t Give Up Too Soon

Probably the most devastating problem in modern society is loneliness, which is even worse for the elderly. John Lewis Christmas advert aims to raise awareness of this situation. Hopefully, this touching ad will not only tug at people’s heartstrings, but will also make people understand how much we need each other, especially now in a year so full of isolation and anxiety.

John Lewis 2020 Christmas Advert Alternative by NimbusBeds.co.uk | Stop Loneliness at Xmas