C1 · C2 · culture · Idioms

English Idioms A Skeleton in the Cupboard

Hi! I’m back with another fun video (well, it’s meant to be fun anyway ). This one’s for the idiom A Skeleton in the cupboard/closet. This idiom actually has an almost humorous use, but I couldn’t find the right type of music, so I hope it doesn’t make you jump out of your skin. (that’s a good one!).

By the way, I had to upload it as Youtube detected that the laughter I used was from the album Thriller! That laughter belonged to Vincent Price! I mean, how can somebody own somebody’s laughter? Ridiculous! Anyway, it took me ages to find it and I had to make a horrible change, such a pity! (it now sounds more like Eddie from Iron Maiden)

C1 · C2 · Idioms

Idioms English Idioms and Expressions that Include Blue

Hi there! I’ve just finished a video that includes quite a few idioms and expressions that have blue in them. I’m gradually getting better at animating and putting all the bits together, but still need to do some work on editing audio files (sorry about this, but I know that I’ll finally get it right 🙂 ). Anyway, I hope you find the video useful. You can also do a short quiz after watching the video.

Photos from Pexels and drawings and animations by me on Krita.

Serena’s blog

C1 · C2 · Idioms

Idiom Between the devil and the deep blue sea

I was wanting to start creating videos that cover English idioms so much, that I’m thrilled to announce that here’s the first of, hopefully quite a few. If you have been learning English for some time, you will already know what an idiom is, but if this is not your case, an idiom is an expression or rather, a group of words whose meaning is not related to what the sentence seems to communicate. In this video, you’ll find the idiom “Between the devil and the deep blue sea”, which means to find yourself in a difficult situation where the alternatives that can allow you to escape from this situation, are not very good. In my second language, which is Spanish, this idiom would be something like ‘estar entre la espada y la pared’. Do you know a similar expression in your language? If you do, I’d really love to hear about it.

PS. I need to improve the audios as it sounds as if I were speaking on the phone.

C1 · C2 · Idioms

12 Idioms related to books or pages

If you find yourself in somebody’s good books, you’re lucky and thankfully, they won’t throw the books at you. But maybe it’s just because you always go by the book or even took a leaf out of somebody else’s book at work. Before you get all bookish trying to figure out what I’m on about, why don’t you try doing this fun quiz with 12 idiomatic expressions related to books or pages? I’m sure you’ll enjoy it.