C1 · C2 · Idioms

Idiom Between the devil and the deep blue sea

I was wanting to start creating videos that cover English idioms so much, that I’m thrilled to announce that here’s the first of, hopefully quite a few. If you have been learning English for some time, you will already know what an idiom is, but if this is not your case, an idiom is an expression or rather, a group of words whose meaning is not related to what the sentence seems to communicate. In this video, you’ll find the idiom “Between the devil and the deep blue sea”, which means to find yourself in a difficult situation where the alternatives that can allow you to escape from this situation, are not very good. In my second language, which is Spanish, this idiom would be something like ‘estar entre la espada y la pared’. Do you know a similar expression in your language? If you do, I’d really love to hear about it.

PS. I need to improve the audios as it sounds as if I were speaking on the phone.

C1 · C2 · Idioms

12 Idioms related to books or pages

If you find yourself in somebody’s good books, you’re lucky and thankfully, they won’t throw the books at you. But maybe it’s just because you always go by the book or even took a leaf out of somebody else’s book at work. Before you get all bookish trying to figure out what I’m on about, why don’t you try doing this fun quiz with 12 idiomatic expressions related to books or pages? I’m sure you’ll enjoy it.

C1 · C2 · Idioms

Health idioms

Image by Nelly Antoniadou on unsplash

If you kick the bucket or feel that you’re at death’s door, you’re obviously feeling quite rotten, but how rotten do you actually feel? On the button below you’ll find some idioms related to health. Don’t forget to hit the like button or suscribe if you found the activity fun!

C1 · C2 · Idioms

C1/C2 Rain idioms and expressions

Photo by Aleksandar Pasaric on Pexels.com

We all know the one about ‘raining cats and dogs’ but what about ‘to rain on somebody’s parade’ or ‘to give something a rain check’? In the link below you’re bound to learn at least one more of the many British idioms.

Go on! Give it a try!

C1 · C2 · Idioms

Cat idioms

White Cat by Rémi Rémino Unplash

I love cats! I just adore them and find them so cute! The thing is, cat lovers can’t understand people that view these animals as selfish and egoistic beings, that only turn to humans when they’re hungry or in need. Nothing could possibly be futher from the truth! Cats just happen to be independent and quite autonomous and perceive their relationships with humans on equal terms; where dogs usually select a leader. The differences found dog-human and cat-human relationships basically boils down to how each one of these pets used to hunt in remote times before their domestication. Wild dogs, always hunted in packs, thus they needed a leader to command and make the most important decisions. Modern-day domesticated dogs, associate their walks with an opportunity to go hunting and so, perceive their owners as the leader of the pack. While felines, usually hunted by themselves (and still do) and would usually perceive an owner as a noisy bother that will probably frighten their prey away.

In Britain cats have always formed an important part of the culture of the isles, be this having a bad name (like during the Dark Ages and Renaissance), where they were associated to witches, or be it enjoying the advantages of being the most popular pet. So, there are are quite a few idioms and phrases that use the word cat or kitten. Here you have a quiz with some of these expressions. I hope you enjoy them and find them fun.

B2 · C1 · C2 · Idioms · vocabulary activity

Green idioms, phrases and vocabulary

Image by Artur Luczka (Unsplash)

What does it mean to be green? And if you’re told to eat your greens? Like all languages, English has quite a few colour idioms and other uses of ‘ green’ and here you have a quiz to find out or learn some of the most typical expressions that use this colour.