C1 · C2 · Open cloze · Word formation

What Doctors Won’t Do…

Use of English activities

Image by Danilo Alvesd Unsplash

Are you one of my type, meaning that you’d ditch the doctor unless you found yourself at death’s door or are you more of the hypochondriac type that literally lives surrounded by huge piles of medical prescriptions? Are you leery of medical treatments or do you leap at the opportunity to have every single organ in your body scrutinized? Whatever position you may side with, you’re bound to find these extracts from The Guardian interesting.  For today, I’ve prepared two, concerned with alternative medical treatments, but I hope to get round to adding a couple more in the near future.

PS. Some years back I treated a cat I had with homeopathy, and guess what? It worked!!!

C1 · C2 · Vocabulary

Vocabulary quiz for illness and medical condition

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

Is it pandemic, plague or epidemic? What’s the word for when I come out covered in rashes? Here’s a vocabulary quiz with some of the most Cish words I’ve found to help make learning vocabulary fun and above all, easy to brush up when needing to refresh our memory for certain words.

C1 · C2 · Idioms

Health idioms

Image by Nelly Antoniadou on unsplash

If you kick the bucket or feel that you’re at death’s door, you’re obviously feeling quite rotten, but how rotten do you actually feel? On the button below you’ll find some idioms related to health. Don’t forget to hit the like button or suscribe if you found the activity fun!

C1 · C2 · Vocabulary

C1-C2 Adjectives for describing bodies

WE HAVE DEEP ROOTS IN THE GREENWOOD

” I fear those grey, old men of Mocca’s Park,” Wrote Francis Kilvert, the Victorian diarist. “Those grey, gnarled, low-browed, knock-kneed, bowed, bent, huge, strange, long-armed, deformed, hunch-backed, misshapen oak men that stand waiting and watching century after century.”

When it comes to describing something or somebody, it is very usual to notice that a student is not using a wide variety of language. All too often, one constantly hears things like “nice, cool, tall, pretty and beautiful” even in the highest levels. This is normal, as a student usually focuses more on other aspects of the language such as syntax and choosing the right verb pattern. However, even when a message has been put forward efficiently and accurately, if the student failed to produce a juicy selection of collocations, adjectives, verbs and even some odd idiom, they won’t get far concerning grades.

In this activity, you can find and practise some adjectives related to weight, shape and muscles. You’ll also have a couple of tips related to adjectives that are used disapprovingly.

C1 · Learning English with songs · Listening

Muse – Uprising

Muse image from Wikipedia

I love this song! Gives one such a feeling of power and recharges batteries. Maybe you like it as much as I do, so you might enjoy doing this listening activity and at the same time, finding out the meaning of some idioms and synonyms. First do the pre-listening activity and after you can do the sentence completion.