B1 · B2 · C1 · Grammar · Grammar activity

The causative: Have/get something done

Causative structures are another form of passive structures where the focus is on something that is done rather than who does it. Here’s a video I made with bitable that will give you some tips on some of the different structures.

After, you can do a grammar activity to practise the structure.

Click for video

Click for activity

 

A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A1/A2 Countable and uncountable nouns

Countable and uncountable nouns in English are on many occasions sort of confusing and sometimes beginners need some picture activities to help them memorize some of the words in English that are uncountable. It may be a bit of a drag, but as a matter of fact, if you don´t know them you will have some problems when you have to use determiners like `much and many`.  Here´s a quick drag-and-drop quiz to help remember some of the rules.

Click for quiz

A2 · B1 · Grammar

1st Conditional game

Oh! This week we’re going to do some work on conditionals. So, just to get this structure under our belt, I’ve set up this fun activity with Wheel decide.

How to play? Click on the wheel and see what you get for the question ‘What will you do if …?

Write down the sentence and spend a minute thinking about your answer, afterwards tell the class.

Example:

What will you do if the person you love asks you out?

Possible answers: If the person I love asks me out, I will go crazy/faint/be extremely happy/buy myself something very smart/go to the hairdresser’s to look great.

Click for Wheel

B1 · B2 · B2 word formation · Grammar · vocabulary activity

Word formation related to personality and behaviour

How would you describe your best friend? Would you say he or she is kind? Does this person always treat people with great kindness? Does your friend always behave kindly in all the majority of situations? And have you ever seen this person be unkind? Here we’ve used the word kind, which is an adjective in different ways, as a noun, as an adverb and even with a negative prefix. To achieve a good level of English, you’ll have to be pretty good at noticing how a word is used or the type of word you will need to complete a sentence. You’ll also need to have a good knowledge on the use of prefixes and suffixes in order to change words from one class to another or even give them a negative meaning. The bad news is that there are quite a few rules and also quite a few exceptions to these rules, but the good news is that through practice, you’ll eventually achieve a reasonable degree of skill for this type of activity.

Every now and then, I’ll try to place some activities on the blog to cover this part of learning English. Please don’t leave this type of content until the day before your exams, as it is only through practice that word formation samples ‘will stick’.

Here’s an activity related to words that we could use to describe people’s characters and they way in which they behave.

Click here for grammar slide

Click here for word formation activity

B1 · B2 · Grammar · Sin categoría

Future perfect simple

If somebody asks you something like the samples below…

  • What will you have achieved by the time you reach forty?
  • How many books will you have read by Christmas?
  • How many English class assignments will I have given you by the end of the term ? 😦

…they are using the future perfect and we’d usually answer this in the following way

  • By the time I reach forty I will have set up my own company.
  • By Christmas I will have read three books.
  • By the end of the term my teacher will have given us tons of English assignments because she is very picky.

 

  • That is: time expression + subject + will + have + past participle

Here’s a fun way to do some language drills.

HOW TO PLAY

  • Pick a partner or ask somebody randomly.
  • Turn the wheel. Say for example you get How many showers (have).
  • Turn the second wheel for time expressions. Say for example you get  ‘in one year’
  • Make a question with these expressions. Example: How many showers will you have had in a year ?
  • Your partner should answer your question.
  • Example: In a year I will have had about ….. showers. (if the partners says he/she has a very low number of showers,  choose another person quickly).

 

In the first wheel you will find expressions related to actions.

Click for action wheel

In this wheel you will find expressions related to time.

Click for time expression wheel

A2 · B1 · B2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Another way to learn irregular verbs

errorman

One way to learn irregular verbs is to divide them into groups.

According to some grammar books, irrregular English verbs DO seem to have some type of regularity.  Here are some tips along with a couple of activities.

 

 

CLASS 1

In this group, verbs remain nearly the same and change final -d for -t.

For example: build> built > built.

CLASS 1 ACTIVITY

CLASS 2

Verbs are the same in Past Simple and Past Participle, receive an -d/-ed/t suffix but change one or more vowels.

For example: leave > left> left

CLASS 2 ACTIVITY

CLASS 3

In this group the Past Simple usually has -ed but the Past Participle had -(e)n.

This is a small group and I suppose I’ll be adding some more if I can remember any.

For example: show > showed > shown

CLASS 3 ACTIVITY

CLASS 4

The past tense doesn’t have a suffix although it may change a vowel, but the Past Participle has an -(e)n suffix and the base vowel changes or both changes may happen.

For example: give > gave > given

CLASS 4 ACTIVITY

CLASS 5

In this group the vowel changes in one or both. There are no other changes.

For example: begin > began > begun

CLASS 5 ACTIVITY

CLASS 6

All the verbs are the same!

For example: put > put > put

CLASS 6 ACTIVITY

CLASS 7

One or both of the forms is/are completely different.

For example: go > went > gone – Be > was/were > been