A1 · Grammar

A1 Keeping active during the pandemic with BBC

Like in most European countries, in Spain we’re in isolation, and have been for six weeks. This means that we can’t leave the house, and those that can and those that can, have to be very careful.

But who says that we can’t do other things around the house and try to keep fit and active? Keeping active will improve our physical health and also help us cope with the worries that this situation is bringing to thousands of families. It’s no joke!

Here are some tips from BBC learning English that shows us some interesting vocabulary and uses the present continuous. What are you doing to stay active?

From BBC Learning English
A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A1/A2 Stative verbs

What are stative verbs? This is important for learners that are now being introduced to the present continuous (I’m writing right now), and need to learn why they can’t say things like ‘I’m loving you’ when a famous fast food chain uses this as a slogan and a famous rock band from the 80s even said ‘I’m Still Loving You’ in one of their most popular hits. By tackling the ‘stative verb’ issue from an early stage, we’ll probably avoid learners making funny structures that are later on very difficult to get rid of because they have become a habit, and although I’m not really sure if this will be effective or not, I’m going to try it out anyway. Here’s a short video that introduces the very basics and after there’s an activity that focuses on some very typical mistakes that we need to avoid.

A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A1/A2 Wh-questions in the past simple

Hello! For today’s class we plan to introduce questions using wh-words.

As I explained in our classes, wh-questions are different from yes/no questions because they don’t need a yes or no for an answer. These questions ask for some missing information (time, place, reason, etc). Can you imagine that somebody asks you the time and you answer ‘yes’? This sounds quite funny because you should give the person the time (hour and minutes).

Another thing to notice in wh-questions is that we use wh-words at the beginning of the question. Here’s an example:

Did you like the film?

Why did you like the film?

Here’s a short video that explains the basics for wh-questions in the past simple. After watching the video, you can click on the quiz button to see how much you learnt.

I hope you find it useful!

A1 · A2 · Grammar

A1 Grammar video Past simple for yes/no questions

Here’s a quick video I created with Bitable with some grammar on how to make yes/no questions in the past simple, when we use a verb that is not ‘be’. Remember that ‘be’ does not have an auxiliary and that to make yes/no questions, we use a subeject- verb order inversion.

Here’s an example: She was happy> Was she happy?

But other verbs like: eat, drink, buy, etc. use an auxiliary ‘did’ and for yes/no questions the word order is the same but the verb is in the infinitive.

Example: She worked yesterday > Did she work yesterday?

Watch the video and notice the examples. After, do the activities that will tell you how many correct answers you got.

Good luck and don’t forget to learn a lot of English now that we can’t leave our houses. If you do a bit every day, you will soon improve a lot.

Hugs!!!!

Serena

video made using Bitable
A1 · Grammar

A1 Grammar video: Past simple in negative sentences

Hi there! Here’s a really super ‘cutre video’ I managed to make without using ‘the proper stuff’. Please, don’t comment (I know you won’t, but just in case). It’s an emergency video for my A1 students who now don’t have classes.