B1 · B2 · Grammar · Sin categoría

Future perfect simple

If somebody asks you something like the samples below…

  • What will you have achieved by the time you reach forty?
  • How many books will you have read by Christmas?
  • How many English class assignments will I have given you by the end of the term ? 😦

…they are using the future perfect and we’d usually answer this in the following way

  • By the time I reach forty I will have set up my own company.
  • By Christmas I will have read three books.
  • By the end of the term my teacher will have given us tons of English assignments because she is very picky.

 

  • That is: time expression + subject + will + have + past participle

Here’s a fun way to do some language drills.

HOW TO PLAY

  • Pick a partner or ask somebody randomly.
  • Turn the wheel. Say for example you get How many showers (have).
  • Turn the second wheel for time expressions. Say for example you get  ‘in one year’
  • Make a question with these expressions. Example: How many showers will you have had in a year ?
  • Your partner should answer your question.
  • Example: In a year I will have had about ….. showers. (if the partners says he/she has a very low number of showers,  choose another person quickly).

 

In the first wheel you will find expressions related to actions.

Click for action wheel

In this wheel you will find expressions related to time.

Click for time expression wheel

A2 · B1 · B2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Another way to learn irregular verbs

errorman

One way to learn irregular verbs is to divide them into groups.

According to some grammar books, irrregular English verbs DO seem to have some type of regularity.  Here are some tips along with a couple of activities.

 

 

CLASS 1

In this group, verbs remain nearly the same and change final -d for -t.

For example: build> built > built.

CLASS 1 ACTIVITY

CLASS 2

Verbs are the same in Past Simple and Past Participle, receive an -d/-ed/t suffix but change one or more vowels.

For example: leave > left> left

CLASS 2 ACTIVITY

CLASS 3

In this group the Past Simple usually has -ed but the Past Participle had -(e)n.

This is a small group and I suppose I’ll be adding some more if I can remember any.

For example: show > showed > shown

CLASS 3 ACTIVITY

CLASS 4

The past tense doesn’t have a suffix although it may change a vowel, but the Past Participle has an -(e)n suffix and the base vowel changes or both changes may happen.

For example: give > gave > given

CLASS 4 ACTIVITY

CLASS 5

In this group the vowel changes in one or both. There are no other changes.

For example: begin > began > begun

CLASS 5 ACTIVITY

CLASS 6

All the verbs are the same!

For example: put > put > put

CLASS 6 ACTIVITY

CLASS 7

One or both of the forms is/are completely different.

For example: go > went > gone – Be > was/were > been

 

A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Present simple for routine and days of the week

What do you do during the weekdays and the weekend?

Here’s a slide with some examples of positive and negative statements using the present simple. You have two different links. The first is for the grammar and the second is to do an activity.

Click for grammar

Activity

Sentence completion

A1 · Grammar

To be or not to be contracted? This is the question

Concerning contracting ‘be’ with ‘not’ there are two forms available where  generally one form is preferred over the other depending on whether the word that comes before is a noun or a pronoun.

For the purpose of an A1 level, this slide is only going to show how both forms are possible.

Click for slide

A1 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Present simple ‘be’ in negative sentences

This one (and many to come) is for my very, very special bunch of students from 2 which I already miss very much because I’m stuck in the house with my leg up in bandage.

First click on the presentation and after on the activity.

Click for slides

Click for grammar activity