A2 · B1 · B2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Another way to learn irregular verbs

errorman

One way to learn irregular verbs is to divide them into groups.

According to some grammar books, irrregular English verbs DO seem to have some type of regularity.  Here are some tips along with a couple of activities.

 

 

CLASS 1

In this group, verbs remain nearly the same and change final -d for -t.

For example: build> built > built.

CLASS 1 ACTIVITY

CLASS 2

Verbs are the same in Past Simple and Past Participle, receive an -d/-ed/t suffix but change one or more vowels.

For example: leave > left> left

CLASS 2 ACTIVITY

CLASS 3

In this group the Past Simple usually has -ed but the Past Participle had -(e)n.

This is a small group and I suppose I’ll be adding some more if I can remember any.

For example: show > showed > shown

CLASS 3 ACTIVITY

CLASS 4

The past tense doesn’t have a suffix although it may change a vowel, but the Past Participle has an -(e)n suffix and the base vowel changes or both changes may happen.

For example: give > gave > given

CLASS 4 ACTIVITY

CLASS 5

In this group the vowel changes in one or both. There are no other changes.

For example: begin > began > begun

CLASS 5 ACTIVITY

CLASS 6

All the verbs are the same!

For example: put > put > put

CLASS 6 ACTIVITY

CLASS 7

One or both of the forms is/are completely different.

For example: go > went > gone – Be > was/were > been

 

A2 · B1 · Grammar activity

Irregular verbs in past simple

going crazy

Feel like pulling your hair out with English irregular verbs? Well, for God’s sake don’t pull them out with irregular verbs it may be painful! (That was a translation from Spanish.  You should pull them out due to/because of irregular verbs). 

Maybe the best way to deal with them is to learn them by heart (I hate memorizing stuff!),  although there might be another way, I don’t know about.  I would even say that it is better to learn both, the past simple and the past participle together (yes, the ones in the third column at the end of your Student’s book). This may seem a pretty daunting activity, but if you set yourself to learning, for example five of them a week, in two months you will have learnt forty of  the most important ones, which isn’t too bad, is it? 

Click here for the activity

 

Sin categoría

Blog not working properly

This message is to say that I have just discovered that many of the activities on the blog are not working properly. This is probably due to that Polldaddy (one of the applications I use for creating activities), has changed to Crowdsignal and for some reason this has  a negative effect on many of the activities I created. I hope it gets sorted out soon as it would be a disgrace if the hundreds and hundreds of hours of work I’ve put into the blog should go straight to the dustbin due to this.

I’ve sent an urgent message to WordPress and hope the blog gets back to normality.

My apologies.

Serena

B1 · B2 · Grammar activity · writing

A Horrible Day

Past perfect or past simple? This is an activity that will help you practise these tenses within a story about Jane, a girl that was looking forward to going to a party, but discovered that being absent-minded wasn’t a good thing ….unless you change the end of the story.

The first part of the activity is to fill in the blanks with the correct form of the verb in brackets. After checking the activity, students can write their own version of the end of the story. (max 50 words).

Once we have all the stories, we’re going to vote the one we like most! 🙂

Click for activity

A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

Present simple for routine and days of the week

What do you do during the weekdays and the weekend?

Here’s a slide with some examples of positive and negative statements using the present simple. You have two different links. The first is for the grammar and the second is to do an activity.

Click for grammar

Activity

Sentence completion

C1 · C2 · Grammar activity · Multiple choice cloze

Multiple choice cloze: Can you be sustainable if you’re into fast fashion online?

Are you a fashion victim? Do you spend huge amounts of money on your wardrobe or are you mostly into second-hand stores? What carbon footprint do you think your clothing issues have on the environment? Here’s a multiple choice cloze for English Advanced levels that may get you into thinking twice before your next click to an online fashion retailer.

Text adapted from BBC News.

Click here