B1 · B2 · Grammar

Indirect questions

Here’s yet another one of those kitsch videos that I have the awful habit of producing every now and then. This one’s for indirect questions. As a reminder, indrect questions are the type of questions we ask when we don’t want to be too direct; maybe because we don’t know the person very well, or simply because we’re asking for personal details.

Here’s an example:

DIRECT: Where do you live? > DIRECT: Can/Could you tell me where you live?

A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A1/A2 Stative verbs

What are stative verbs? This is important for learners that are now being introduced to the present continuous (I’m writing right now), and need to learn why they can’t say things like ‘I’m loving you’ when a famous fast food chain uses this as a slogan and a famous rock band from the 80s even said ‘I’m Still Loving You’ in one of their most popular hits. By tackling the ‘stative verb’ issue from an early stage, we’ll probably avoid learners making funny structures that are later on very difficult to get rid of because they have become a habit, and although I’m not really sure if this will be effective or not, I’m going to try it out anyway. Here’s a short video that introduces the very basics and after there’s an activity that focuses on some very typical mistakes that we need to avoid.

After, you may want to do the activities that I have attached below.

A1 · Listening

A1 Present continuous fun vintage-video

Wow! I found this video on Youtube from Language Planet Toluca (I subcribed and gave them a like, too). It’s sort of ‘vintage’ (and I almost freaked out when I saw those guys chanting in the kitchen), but it’s fun and you have lots of opportunities to hear the present continuous and vocabulary related to homes. Watch the video and after, you can do the listening on the button below.

from Language Planet Toluca
A1 · A2 · Grammar · Grammar activity

A1/A2 Wh-questions in the past simple

Hello! For today’s class we plan to introduce questions using wh-words.

As I explained in our classes, wh-questions are different from yes/no questions because they don’t need a yes or no for an answer. These questions ask for some missing information (time, place, reason, etc). Can you imagine that somebody asks you the time and you answer ‘yes’? This sounds quite funny because you should give the person the time (hour and minutes).

Another thing to notice in wh-questions is that we use wh-words at the beginning of the question. Here’s an example:

Did you like the film?

Why did you like the film?

Here’s a short video that explains the basics for wh-questions in the past simple. After watching the video, you can click on the quiz button to see how much you learnt.

I hope you find it useful!